A Path Toward Intelligent Services using Dumb Infrastructure on Stupid, Fat Networks?

“The key property of general-purpose computer is that they are general purpose. We can use them to deterministically model any physical system, of which they are not themselves a part, to an arbitrary degree of accuracy. Their logical limits arise when we try to get them to model a part of the world that includes themselves.”

—  P. Cockshott, L. M. MacKenzie and  G. Michaelson, Computation and its Limits, Oxford University Press, Oxford 2012, p 215

“The test of a framework, however, is not what one can say about it in principle but what one can do with it”

—  Andrew Wells, Rethinking Cognitive Computation: Turing and the Science of the Mind, Palgrave, Macmillan, 2006.

Summary

The “Convergence of Clouds, Grids and their Management” conference track is devoted to discussing current and emerging trends in virtualization, cloud computing, high-performance computing, Grid computing and cognitive computing. The tradition that started in WETICE2009 “to analyze current trends in Cloud Computing and identify long-term research themes and facilitate collaboration in future research in the field that will ultimately enable global advancements in the field that are not dictated or driven by the prototypical short term profit driven motives of a particular corporate entity” has resulted in a new computing model that was included in the Turing Centenary Conference proceedings in 2012. More recently, a product based on these ideas was discussed in the 2013 Open Server Summit (www.serverdesignsummit.com), where many new ideas and technologies were presented to exploit the new generation of many-core servers, high-bandwidth networks and high-performance storage. We present here some thoughts on current trends which we hope will stimulate further research to be discussed in the WETICE 2014 conference track in Parma, Italy (http://wetice.org).

Introduction

Current IT datacenters have evolved from their server-centric, low-bandwidth origins to distributed and high-bandwidth environments where resources can be dynamically allocated to applications using computing, network and storage resource virtualization. While Virtual machines improve resiliency and provide live migration to reduce the recovery time objectives in case of service failures, the increased complexity of hypervisors, their orchestration, Virtual Machine images and their movement and management adds an additional burden in the datacenter.

Further automation trends continue to move toward static applications (locked-in-a-virtual machine, often as one application in one virtual machine) in a dynamic infrastructure (virtual servers, virtual networks, virtual storage, Virtual Image managers etc.). The safety and survival of applications and end to end service transactions delivered by a group of applications are managed by dynamically monitoring and controlling the resources at run-time in real-time. As services migrate to distributed environments where applications contributing to a service transaction are deployed in different datacenters and public or private clouds often owned by different providers, resource management across distributed resources is provided using myriad point solutions and tools that monitor, orchestrate and control these resources. A new call for application-centric infrastructure proposes that the infrastructure provide (http://blogs.cisco.com/news/application-centric-infrastructure-a-new-era-in-the-data-center/ ):

  • Application Velocity (Any workload, anywhere): Reducing application deployment time through a fully automated and programmatic infrastructure for provisioning and placement. Customers will be able to define the infrastructure requirements of the application, and then have those requirements applied automatically throughout the infrastructure.
  • A common platform for managing physical, virtual and cloud infrastructure: The complete integration across physical and virtual, normalizing endpoint access while delivering the flexibility of software and the performance, scale and visibility of hardware across multi-vendor, virtualized, bare metal, distributed scale out and cloud applications
  • Systems Architecture: A holistic approach with the integration of infrastructure, services and security along with the ability to deliver simplification of the infrastructure, integration of existing and future services with real time telemetry system wide.
  • Common Policy, Management and Operations for Network, Security, Applications: A common policy management framework and operational model driving automation across Network, Security and Application IT teams that is extensible to compute and storage in the future.
  • Open APIs, Open Source and Multivendor: A broad ecosystem of partners who will be empowered by a comprehensive published set of APIs and innovations contributed to open source.
  • The best of Custom and Merchant Silicon: To provide highly scalable, programmatic performance, low-power platforms and optics innovations that protect investments in existing cabling plants, and optimize capital and operational expenditures.

Perhaps this approach will work in a utopian IT landscape where either the infrastructure is provided by a single vendor or universal standards force all infrastructures to support common API. Unfortunately the real world evolves in a diverse, heterogeneous and competitive environment and what we are left with is a strategy that cannot scale and lacks end-to-end service visibility and control. End-to-end security becomes difficult to assure because of the myriad security management systems that control distributed resources. The result is open source systems that attempt to fill this niche. Unfortunately, in a highly networked world where multiple infrastructure providers provide a plethora of diverse technologies that evolve at a rapid rate to absorb high-paced innovations, orchestrating the infrastructure to meet the changing workload requirements that applications must deliver is a losing battle. The complexity and tool fatigue resulting from layers of virtualization and orchestration of orchestrators is crippling the operation and management of datacenters (virtualized or not) requiring 70% of current IT budgets going toward keeping the lights on. An explosion of tools, special purpose appliances (for Disaster Recovery, IP security, Performance optimization etc.) and administrative controls have escalated operation and management costs. Gartner Report estimates that for every 1$ spent on development of an application, another $1.31 is spent on assuring safety & survival. While all vendors agree upon Open Source, Open API, and multi-vendor support, reality is far from it. An example is the recent debate about whether OpenStack should include Amazon AWS API support while the leading cloud provider conveniently ignores the competing API.

The Strategy of Dynamic Virtual Infrastructure

The following picture presented in the Open Server Summit Presents a vision of future datacenter with a virtual switch network overlay over physical network.

Virtual NetworkFigure 1: Network Virtualization: What It Is and Why It Matters – Presented in Open Server Summit in 2013

Bruce Davie, Principal Engineer, VMware

In addition to the Physical network connecting physical servers, an overlay of virtual network inside the physical server to connect the virtual machines inside a physical server. In addition, a plethora of virtual machines are being introduced to replace the physical routers and switches that control the physical network. The quest to dynamically reconfigure the network at run-time to meet the changing application workloads, business priorities and latency constraints has introduced layers of additional network infrastructure albeit software-defined. While applications are locked in a virtual server, the infrastructure is evolving to dynamically reconfigure itself to meet changing application needs. Unfortunately this strategy can not scale in a distributed environment where different infrastructure providers deploy myriad heterogeneous technologies and management strategies and results in orchestrators of orchestrators contributing to complexity and tool fatigue in both datacenters and clod environments (private or public).

Figure 2 shows a new storage management architecture also presented in the Open Server Summit.

Virtual Storage

Figure 2: PCI Express Supersedes SAS and SATA in Storage – Presented in Open Server Summit 2013, Akber Kazmi, Senior Marketing Director, PLX Technology

The PCIe switch allows a converged physical storage fabric at half the cost and half the power of current infrastructure. In order to leverage these benefits, the management infrastructure has to accommodate it which adds to the complexity.

In addition, it is estimated that the data traffic inside the datacenter is about 1000 times that of the data that is sent to and received from the users outside. This completely changes the role of TCP/IP traffic inside the datacenter and consequently the communication architecture between applications inside the datacenter. It does not anymore make sense for Virtual machines running inside a Many-core server to use TCP/IP as long as they are within the datacenter. In fact, it makes more sense for them to communicate via shared memory when they are executed on different cores within a processor, communicate via high speed bus when they are executed on different processors in the same server and a high speed network when they are executed in different servers in the same datacenter. TCP/IP is only needed when communicating with users outside the datacenter who can only be accessed via the Internet.

Figure 3 shows the server evolution.

Server

Figure 3: Servers for the New Style of IT – Presented in Open Server summit 2013, Dwight Barron, HP Fellow and Chief Technologies Hyper-scale Server Business Segment, HP Servers Global Business Unit, Hewlett-Packard

As the following picture presents, current evolution of the datacenter is designed to provide dynamic control of resources for addressing the work-load fluctuations at run-time, changing business priorities and real-time latency constraints. The applications are static in a Virtual or Physical Server and the software defined infrastructure dynamically adjusts to changing application needs.

Complexity1

Figure 4: Macro Trends, Complexity, and SDN – Presentation in the Open Server Summit 2013, David Meyer, CTO/Chief Architect, Brocade

Cognitive Containers & Self-Managing Intelligent Services on Static Infrastructure

With the advent of many-core servers, high bandwidth technologies connecting these servers, and new class of high performance storage devices that can be optimized to meet the workload needs (IOPs intensive, throughput sensitive or capacity hungry), is it time to look at a static infrastructure with dynamic application/service management to reduce IT complexity in both datacenters and clouds (public or private)? This is possible if we can virtualize the applications inside a server (physical or virtual) and decouple the safety and survival of the applications and groups of applications that contribute to a distributed transaction from myriad resource management systems that provision and control a plethora of distributed resources supporting these applications.

The Cognitive Container discussed in the Open Server Summit (http://lnkd.in/b7-rfuK) presents the decoupling required between application and service management and underlying distributed resource management systems. Cognitive Container is specially designed to decouple the management of an application and service transactions that a group of distributed applications execute from the infrastructure management systems, at run-time, controlling their resources that are often owned or operated by different providers. The safety and survival of the application at run-time is put ahead by infusing the knowledge about the application (such as the intent, non-functional attributes, run-time constraints, connections and communication behaviors) into the container and using this information to monitor and manage the application at run-time. The Cognitive Container is instantiated and managed by a Distributed Cognitive Transaction Platform (DCTP) that sits between the applications and the OS facilitating the run-time management of Cognitive Containers. The DCTP does not require any changes to the application, OS or the infrastructure and uses the local OS in a physical or virtual server. A network of Cognitive Containers infused with similar knowledge about the service transaction they execute also is managed at run-time to assure the safety and survival based on policies dictated by business priorities, run-time workload fluctuations and real-time latency constraints. The Cognitive Container network using replication, repair, recombination and reconfiguration properties provide dynamic service management independent of infrastructure management systems at run-time. The Cognitive Containers are designed to use the local operating system to monitor the application vital signs (CPU, memory, bandwidth, latency, storage capacity, IOPs and throughput) and run-time behavior to manage the application to conform to the policies.

The cognitive container can be deployed in a physical or virtual server and does not require any changes to the applications, OSs or the infrastructure. Only the knowledge about the functional and n0n-functional requirements has to be infused into the Cognitive Container. The following figure shows a Cognitive Network deployed in a distributed infrastructure. The Cognitive Container and the service management are designed to provide auto-scaling, self-repair, live-migration and end-to-end service transaction security independent of infrastructure management system.

service visibility

Figure 5: End-to-End Service Visibility and Control in a Distributed Datacenter (Virtualized or Not) – Presented in the Open Server Summit

Rao Mikkilineni, Chief Scientist, C3 DNA

Using the Cognitive Container network it is possible to create a federated service creation, delivery and assurance platforms that transcend the physical and virtual server boundaries and geographical locations as shown in figure below.

 Platform

Figure 6: Federated Services Fabric with Service Creation, delivery and assurance processes decoupled from Resource provisioning, management and control.

This architecture provides an opportunity to simplify the infrastructure where a tiered server, storage and network infrastructure that is static and hardwired to provide various servers (physical or virtual) with specified service levels (CPU, memory, network bandwidth, latency, storage capacity and throughput) the cognitive containers are looking for based on their QoS requirements. It does not matter what technology is used to provision these servers with required service levels. The Cognitive Containers monitor these vital signs using the local OS and if they are not adequate, they will migrate to other servers where they are adequate based on policies determined by business priorities, run-time workload fluctuations and real-time latency constraints.

The infrastructure provisioning then becomes a simple matter of matching the Cognitive Container to the server based on QoS requirements. Thus the Cognitive Container services network provides a mechanism to deploy intelligent (self-aware, self-reasoning and self-controlling) services using dumb infrastructure with limited intelligence about services and applications (matching application profile to the server profile) on stupid pipes that are designed to provide appropriate performance based on different technologies as discussed in the Open Server Summit.

The managing and safekeeping of application required to cope with a non-deterministic impact on workloads from changing demands, business priorities, latency constraints, limited resources and security threats is very similar to how cellular organisms manage life in a changing environment. The managing and safekeeping of life efficiently at the lowest level of biological architecture that provides the resiliency was in his mind when von Neumann was presenting his Hixon lecture (Von Neumann, J. (1987) Papers of John von Neumann on Computing and Computing Theory, Hixon Symposium, September 20, 1948, Pasadena, CA, The MIT Press, Massachusetts, p474). ‘‘The basic principle of dealing with malfunctions in nature is to make their effect as unimportant as possible and to apply correctives, if they are necessary at all, at leisure. In our dealings with artificial automata, on the other hand, we require an immediate diagnosis. Therefore, we are trying to arrange the automata in such a manner that errors will become as conspicuous as possible, and intervention and correction follow immediately.’’ Comparing the computing machines and living organisms, he points out that the computing machines are not as fault tolerant as the living organisms. He goes on to say ‘‘It’s very likely that on the basis of philosophy that every error has to be caught, explained, and corrected, a system of the complexity of the living organism would not run for a millisecond.’’ Perhaps the Cognitive Container bridges this gap by infusing self-management into computing machines that manage the external world while also managing themselves with self-awareness, reasoning, and control based on policies and best practices.

Cognitive Containers or not, the question is how do we address the problem of ever increasing complexity and cost in current datacenter and cloud offerings? This will be a major theme in the 4th conference track on the Convergence of Distributed Clouds, Grids and their management at WETICE2014 in Parma, Italy.

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